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Plant & Forest Resources

The following is a list of resources, including the many native plants, shrubs and trees that grow well in BYC. The best way to introduce plants is to buy from local native plant nurseries. Growing plants from seed is difficult and slow.

Also, check out our Planting & Forest Policies page for more great information.

 

BYC Consultation

Steve and Dale can provide resources for native plant material and assist you with native planting ideas and design.

Steve Sandstrom  – Forest and Watershed Committee Chair

(715) 209-5839    sandstrom.steve@gmail.com

Dale Klubertanz  – BYC neighbor & member of the Forest and Watershed Committee

(608) 235-0031    dsklubertanz@tds.net

Brush Management/Pick-Up

 

The BYC Forest and Watershed Committee has been asked to create a policy and procedure for the disposal of brush and forest waste.  It will be electronically distributed to the owners upon its completion.  In the meantime, contact Dale Klubertanz, Forest and Watershed Committee Chair, if you have questions about what is appropriate, or not appropriate, for removal.

Contact Jeffery Garrett to make arrangements for pick-up of small amounts of small limb and other forest debris that may have fallen around your cabin.

Community Resources/Vendors

• Northern Native Plantscapes in Cable, WI. Sarah can provide design and planting services for native landscapes. Sarah Boles | (715) 794-2548 | florabee@hotmail.com

• Sigurd Olson Environmental Institute (SOEI) at Northland College. Students can work with residents to design and plant native plants. – Mike Gardner | (715) 682-1481 | mgardner@northland.edu

• Wildflower Woods – Greenhouse featuring native plants for woodlands, Becky Brown | (715) 373-0214

• Freehands Farm – Michelle Rundeen | (715) 563-0323

• Boreal Natives – Native flowers – (218) 729-9044

• Great Lakes Nursery Co. – Native plants – 1-(888) 733-3564

Native Flowers

• Ferns – Lady, Sensitive, Maidenhair, Oak – wet

• Trillium – white – spring – tolerate wet soil

• Aster – Many varieties of Aster –heart leaved, large leaved, flat topped, purple stemmed

• Cardinal Flower – red – late summer – roots should be very wet

• Bloodroot – white – spring

• Jacob’s Ladder – blue – spring

• Virginia Bluebells – blue – summer

• Woodland Phlox – pale lavender – spring

• Dutchman’s Breeches – white – spring

• Swamp Buttercups – bright yellow – summer – wet – aggressive

• Solomon’s Seal – spring – white

• Wild Geranium – pink – spring – dry

• Bunchberry – red berries – ground cover

• Columbine – red and yellow – spring – deciduous woods

• Thimbleberry – tall – edible fruit

• Wood Anemone – small & delicate – white – spring – dry shade

• Jack in the Pulpit – spring

• Wild Ginger – ground cover

• Blue Flag Iris – wet – purple summer

• Touch Me-Not – orange seed pods in fall

• Marsh Marigold – yellow – spring – wet shade

• Hepatica – dry shade – blue – spring

• Tall Bellflower – blue – summer – wet shade

• Blue Cohosh – yellow – spring – blue berries – wet deciduous woods – tall

• Clintonia – yellow flower followed by blue berry – poisonous

• Wild Lupine – purple – summer – dry soil even sand (what you see along the roads is not wild)

• Fireweed – magenta – summer – aggressive – dry

• Yarrow – white – summer – tolerate dry soil

• Black Eyed Susan – tolerate very dry soil – yellow with black center – summer to fall

• Columbine – red & yellow – spring

• Aster – Lots of varieties of Asters, especially Big Leaf Aster

• Pearly Everlasting – white – summer – nice dried flowers

• Coneflowers – several varieties – white, yellow, purple, green – summer – tall

• Canada Anemone – white – wet meadows – spring & summer

• Joe Pye Weed – pink – summer – wet – tall

• Thimbleweed – white – dry – summer

• Monarda – purple – summer

• Blue Vervain – blue – spring – tall – tolerates wet soil

• Milkweed – attracts butterflies

Native Shrubs

• Chokeberry – need moist soil (not glossy black chokeberry)

• Red Twig Dogwood – good winter color – wet or medium wet soil

• Grey Dogwood – wet

• Viburnum – “Arrowwood” or “Nannyberry” – good fall color – berries

• Canada Yew – low spreading evergreen

• Bush Honeysuckle – spring flowers

• Winterberry – wet

• All shade shrubs

• Coralberry

• Wild blackberry and raspberry

• Sumac – red berries – good fall color

• Wild roses – various varieties

• Elderberry – edible fruit – spring white flower

• American Hazelnut

• Blueberries – sandy soil

• Serviceberry

Trees

• Balsam Fir (Dominant)

• Canada Plum

• White Spruce (Dominant)

• Mountain Ash

• White Pine

• Serviceberry

• White (Paper) Birch

• Mountain Maple

• White Cedar

• Tag Alder

• Eastern Hemlock

• Tamarack

• Red Oak

• Big Leaf Poplar

• Red Maple

• Balsam Poplar

• Sugar Maple

• Ironwood

• Red Pine

• Yellow Birch

• Trembling Aspen

• Colorodo Blue Spruce

• Australian & Scotch Pine

• Norway & Black Hills Spruce

• Willow Trees

• Douglas Fir (California)

• Crab Apple & Fruit Trees

• Japanese Whitespire Birch

• Honeylocust Trees

• Aborvitaes

• Fraser Fir

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